Connect with us

SEO

Everything You Need To Know

Published

on

Everything You Need To Know


Imagine you’re researching for a blog post.

You find a fantastic image that adds a lot of depth to your content. The problem is, that the site where you found it isn’t the original source, nor does it link to the original source.

Who created the image? You need this information if you want to cite your sources properly in your blog and give correct credit where it’s due.

The answer: Do a reverse image search to find the original source.

This feature is easy, quick, and available on most of the major search engines today.

A reverse image search is also great if you want to look up where your own images appear on the web.

Here’s your comprehensive guide to reverse image search on today’s major image search engines (including both desktop and mobile):

Let’s get started.

What Is Reverse Image Search?

Reverse image search isn’t as complex as it sounds.

It simply involves searching the internet with an image instead of keywords.

In most browsers, you can upload your image (or paste in the image’s URL), hit “search,” and you’ll be given tons of valuable information, such as:

  • The sizes in which the image appears across the web.
  • Keywords/possible related searches to the image.
  • A list of links where the image appears online.
  • Visually similar images.

As you can see, reverse image search lets you explore an image in-depth, which can be pretty handy.

Why Use Reverse Image Search?

Reverse image search is fun to do when you have a few extra minutes in your day and you feel like playing detective.

But, it’s extremely useful as well.

You can use it to:

  • Find interesting facts about an image you like.
  • Learn the copyright status of an image before using it.
  • Track copyright violations on images you’re already using.
  • Find out if other people are using your images.
  • Find the original source of an image you’d like to add to the content.

Why Reverse Image Search Sometimes Doesn’t Work?

Reverse image search doesn’t always work.

There are times when you’ll search for an image and get zero results.

When this happens, it’s likely because the website on which the image appears prevents images from being indexed.

Also, data centers can be slightly out of sync.

This means some users can find the image using reverse image search while others can’t.

How To Do Reverse Image Search On Today’s Major Search Engines

You can use your favorite search engine (Google, Bing, Yandex) to perform a reverse image search.

Or, if you want to use a search engine created specifically for reverse image search, TinEye is a tool for that exact purpose.

Lastly, it doesn’t matter whether you’re using a Mac or PC for this task. The browser you use makes no difference, either (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, etc. work just fine).

How To Do A Reverse Image Search On Google (Desktop)

1. Open Google On A Compatible Browser

Reverse image search works on Safari, Firefox, and Chrome.

Once you have access to a browser, open Google Images.

2. Upload Your Image

If you found an image online you would like to look up, one option before doing a reverse image search is to save it to your desktop.

Then, once you’ve navigated to Google Images, go to the right side of the search bar and click the camera icon.

Screenshot from Google Images, May 2022

Upload your picture by either dragging and dropping it into the search area or by loading the file from your desktop.

Note: You can only search for one image at a time.

3. Or, Paste The Image’s URL

If the image is not saved to your desktop, you can also click on the camera icon to paste in the photo’s URL.

To get the photo’s URL, right-click the image with your mouse and select “Open image in new tab.”

Highlight the URL in the browser bar and simultaneously hold down the “Command” key (or the “CTRL” key on PC) and the “C” key to copy the text.

Then, click the “Paste image URL” tab.

google image search paste urlScreenshot from Google Images, May 2022

Insert your copied URL into the available space.

You can do this by right-clicking the text box and selecting “Paste,” or you can select the text box with your mouse and hit the keys “Command” (or “CTRL” on PC) and “V” simultaneously.

4. Explore Your Results

Once you click “Search by image,” you will see your uploaded photo at the top of the page along with some suggested keywords.

Next to the image, Google will also tell you if there are other sizes of the image available for you to download.

From there, you can explore similar images or check out websites that contain the image.

Google Images search resultsScreenshot from Google Images, May 2022

How To Do A Reverse Image Search On Google (Chrome App On A Mobile Device)

Need to do a quick reverse image search when you’re on the go?

Here’s how to do it without turning on your computer.

1. Open Google Images In Your Chrome App

Using the Chrome app is an easy way to use reverse image search on your phone if you’re pulling a picture from the web.

Open your Chrome app and pull up Google Image Search via images.google.com.

2. Search For Your Image

Sample image searchScreenshot from search for [computer backgrounds], Google, May 2022

Type keywords for the image you’re looking for into the search bar and tap the magnifying glass.

A list of images will appear.

Tap your desired image.

3. Select “Search Google For this Image”

Reverse Image Search: Everything You Need To KnowScreenshot from Google, May 2022

After you open the image on your phone, click and hold on the picture.

A drop-down menu will appear with several options.

Click the bottom tab that says, “Search Google for This Image.”

4. Explore Your Results

A new tab will open in Chrome, showing you where else the image is located and the different sizes available.

How To Do A Reverse Image Search On Google (Mobile, In A Browser)

1. Open Google Images In Your Web Browser

The easiest way to do a reverse search on your phone is to download the Chrome app as outlined above, but it is possible to do it in your browser, too.

The first step, naturally, is to open Google Images in your browser.

2. Switch To Desktop View

Reverse Image Search: Everything You Need To KnowScreenshot from Google, May 2022

You’ll notice that, once you pull up Google Images on your phone, there is nowhere to search an image.

To obtain that feature, change the website settings to the desktop view:

  • Click the double “AA” icon in the top left corner of the search bar.
  • Select the third option on the drop-down menu that says, “Request Desktop Website.”

This will change the screen to look like the Google browser you would traditionally see on your computer.

3. Upload An Image

Reverse Image Search: Everything You Need To KnowScreenshot from Google Images, May 2022

Click the camera icon on the right side of the Google Images search bar to explore your desired image.

Two options will appear: “Paste image URL” and “Upload an image.”

If the image is uploaded on your camera roll, select “Upload an image,” click “Photo Library” and select your picture.

The browser will then upload the photo for you.

You can also choose to take a photo or browse your previous documents or screenshots when uploading a file.

4. Or, Paste The Image URL

Reverse Image Search: Everything You Need To KnowScreenshot from Google Images, May 2022

If you don’t have the image saved on your phone, select the “Paste image URL” tab.

To obtain your picture’s URL, open the photo in your browser, hold the image down, and select “Copy.”

After that, paste your URL into the URL upload tab. This is done on most phones by double-tapping the search box and selecting “Paste.”

5. Explore Your Results

After you either upload your image or paste the URL, click the search icon.

The website will show you related searches, other available image sizes and websites containing the same picture.

How To Do Reverse Image Search On Google (iPhone)

Open your browser and go to images.google.com.

If you’re using Safari, click on the double “AA” icon on the left side of the browser search bar.

If you’re using Chrome, look at the bottom-right of your screen for the three dots and click that.

Select “Request Desktop Site.”

Upload your image to see the results.

How To Do Reverse Image Search On Bing

Click on the “Images option on the top left side of Bing’s homepage.

Select the “Search using an image icon on the search bar.

bing search using an imageScreenshot from Bing Images, May 2022

At this point, your options are to drag an image into the search box, upload an image manually by searching files on your computer, or paste an image or URL.

Sample visual search on BingScreenshot from Bing Images, May 2022

Note: Unlike with Google, you can drag more than one image into the search bar!

Here are the results for a photo uploaded from desktop.

Bing image search resultsScreenshot from Bing Images, May 2022

You can click on tabs to view pages where the image appears, similar images, and related searches.

How To Do Reverse Image Search On Yandex

On Yandex, click Imageson the top left of the search bar.

yandex image searchScreenshot from Yandex, May 2022

Click on the camera icon.

yandex search by imageScreenshot from Yandex Visual Search, May 2022

You’ll get the option to enter your image’s URL or upload a photo from your desktop.

Let’s say you decide to save and then upload the photo from desktop. You’ll get results like these.

yandex image search resultsScreenshot from Yandex Images, May 2022

If you scroll down, you’ll see similar images and a list of all the pages where the image is displayed.

How To Do Reverse Image Search On TinEye

TinEye is the search engine where you can do a quick, no-nonsense reverse image search.

tineye reverse image searchScreenshot from TinEye, May 2022

To start, click the “Upload” button on the left side of the search bar to browse saved images on your desktop.

Or, paste the image’s URL into the search bar.

You can also drag and drop an image from an open browser tab straight into the TinEye homepage.

When you’re done, you’ll get results like these.

tineye image search resultsScreenshot from TinEye, May 2022

The cool part is you can use filters to search by image size, newest or oldest post, best match, and most changed.

You can also filter by website or collection to narrow down your results.

tineye image search filtersScreenshot from TinEye, May 2022

Reverse Image Search: The Easy Way To Research Images

Reverse image search is useful, easy, and fun.

There are a ton of reasons why you might want to do a reverse image search.

  • You want to know if you can post the image on your site.
  • You want to find the original source or creator of an image.
  • You want to know who’s using your images.
  • You’re just curious about an image you like.

And, you can do a reverse image search on your favorite browser, no matter what that may be.

You’re not limited by device, either. It’s easy to do on Mac or PC, iPhone or Android, mobile or desktop.

Now you have no excuse not to track down the origins of that mysterious, yet amazing, image that will add depth to your blog post.

So, get out there and play image detective!

More Resources:


Featured Image: AboutLife/Shutterstock





Source link

SEO

Better Alternatives To ‘Click Here’

Published

on

Example of CTA


Nothing is more boring and unmotivating to a user than seeing a big “Click Here” or “Learn More” link.

As a user, they’re already researching a product or a service they want to purchase. Of course, they’re going to click links to learn more.

Going Beyond “Click Here” Or “Learn More”

So, how do we get users motivated to take the action that we want them to?

It begins by:

  • Understanding user goals and user behavior.
  • Establishing trust.
  • Creating accessible, clearly labeled directions that inspire interest.

It sounds so easy in theory, but in truth, why are our webpages only converting at an average of 2.8% in the US?

Obviously, something is missing from our webpages. If 97.2% of us don’t convert on a webpage, we’re likely confusing our users on what we want them to do to some degree.

Let’s dive into how we can accomplish this.

While You’re Here, Go There Now

The trick to optimizing calls to action is to present the action at the precise moment when your website visitor is most interested in taking the next step.

If a user is met with a call to action before any information, do you think they are going to click on it?

There has to be compelling content preceding the link, as well as an accurate description of the landing page.

If the landing page isn’t what a user expected, every time you present another opportunity to leave the page, your user may not trust that you can help them solve their problem.

The call to action is clearly labeled in the example below.

Even better, it is obvious designers understand their customers’ fears over money, ease of use, customer confidence, and the use of color.

Screenshot from TurboTax.Intuit.com, June 2022

First Date Links

When your webpage visitor is ready to take action, they must feel confident that the link invitation is worthwhile, credible, and constructive.

When you present a new product offering, nothing should prevent your visitor from immediately seeing what it is.

We may begin by being sly, especially if we want something. I call these “First Date Links.”

Example of CTA with no products or content.Screenshot by author, June 2022

The screenshot above is taken from an ecommerce website. What you see here is the entire top half of the homepage.

There is no text. There are no product images.

First-time visitors would need to know in advance what the company is selling.

With this website, first-time visitors are required to scroll down, wait for the gigantic images to load, and scan minimal text to gain a better understanding of the brand and its products.

The fun part of this “First Date Links” example is knowing that this particular brand runs this special or something similar to it every single day.

There is no incentive to “shop now” for regular customers and first-time visitors have no idea where that “shop now” button is taking them.

They’ve been presented with this link that will likely overwhelm them with choice and decision paralysis – and most likely leave the site.

Try adding specific promotions for your loyal customers, or even first-time customers, into your marketing strategy.

By creating specific promotions segmented by customer type, you’re showing that you understand what they’re searching for.

Trust, credibility, and being forthcoming with your story add spice to calls to action on websites and real-life too.

Scarecrow Links

If you have watched the original film, “The Wizard of Oz,” you will understand why I refer to these calls to action as “Scarecrow Links.”

These are calls to action that provide many choices, usually with vague labels and often to the same destination.

In the film, when Dorothy is traveling the Yellow Brick Road to find Oz, she comes upon the Scarecrow and asks for directions.

Dorothy: Now which way do we go?
Scarecrow: Pardon me. That way is a very nice way… [pointing]
Dorothy: Who said that?
[Toto barks at the Scarecrow]
Dorothy: Don’t be silly, Toto. Scarecrows don’t talk!
Scarecrow: It’s pleasant down that way too! [pointing in another direction]
Dorothy: That’s funny. Wasn’t he pointing the other way?
Scarecrow: Of course, people do go both ways [pointing in both directions]. That’s the trouble. I can’t make up my mind. I haven’t got a brain. Only straw.

Sometimes, calls to action are placed within webpage content at a moment when we really don’t want choices. We just want to be directed to that cool thing you just showed us.

In the example below, the top CTA is the best option because the destination is clearly defined and is the desired user task.

Example of 3 call to action buttons in a row.Screenshot by author, June 2022

If the company wants customers to learn more about curvy jeans, they can provide this information on the landing page that presents sorting options when they click to shop all the curvy jeans.

The smaller link to details would make more sense if it explained what the details are about.

Is it a size chart? Pricing?

What does that link do for us that “Learn more” doesn’t offer?

What does the user really want to do here after they have been shown images of curvy jeans?

Link Optimization Is More Than A Label

This next example is a mixture of a button, text sentence, and text sentence with a clickable icon overlaying a large header image.

If you were to watch someone using your website during a live session, you would most likely watch them mouse over the button, the text, and the text with the icon to see which one is going to go somewhere they want to go.

For this example, the “Learn more” button label provides no information about what we are going to learn.

It is the most visible CTA and the eyes of the person in the image are facing the button, which is a designer trick because studies show we look to see what the face is looking at.

How can we optimize the CTA for this page?

First, remove the “Learn More” button. We are going to give it an upgrade.

The text below the image, in tiny font size, is not linked. It asks a question, but the user must look for where to get the answer.

It also asks a question that may not be as important or interesting as the one following it. I would remove the entire “Want to get to know us better” sentence.

The more compelling story is why.

The button can be larger and placed in line with the model’s eye gaze. The button label is the invitation to “See why we do what we do” and link that to their story.

Not only does this narrow the choice to one link for one lead task, but it is easier for screen reader software to announce the link and direct visitors listening to the page.

Link optimization is more than a label.

Links with labels such as “Learn more,” “Read more,” “Shop now,” “Submit,” “Click here,” “Download,” and “Continue” are common.

However, these links are probably less likely to be clicked on than a more specific, inviting link.

Don’t be afraid to experiment to optimize calls to action by inviting the action. Don’t be afraid to tell the user what you want them to do by clicking that link.

If anything, you’re guiding them on their purchase decision journey.

Now, sometimes we may get a little too enthusiastic with our link text.

Example of CTA from ecommerce site.Screenshot by author, June 2022

Every Call To Action Is A Risk

Remember that when providing a call to action, it must be placed at the moment when you inspired your reader to leave their train of thought.

Every call to action is a risk. At the minimum, your link should:

  • Have a clear label with the exact destination.
  • Be easy to see and read.
  • Be compelling to the person.
  • Present itself at the exact moment when it is most useful.
  • Not have competition (other links) nearby.
  • Navigate to the desired task that will provide a benefit to your user.

As humans, our attention span is already short.

Each time a call to action takes them forward, they may have forgotten where they just were.

It is important to support tasks with well-organized information architecture and navigation that provides signals for a sense of place.

Calls to action are sometimes annoying interruptions.

What additional incredibly fascinating information is hiding behind “Learn more” that is so compelling that you have interrupted their thought process?

It better be worth it.

Conclusion

We have a small window of time to catch a user’s attention.

Using generic language like “Click Here” or “Learn More” won’t cut it anymore. When creating call-to-actions for a user, try to reiterate what exactly you want them to do.

Don’t insert CTA links for the sake of having them or taking up space.

Rethink your link strategy by viewing it from a user’s point of view: Is there more than one link option? Are they both needed? Are they clear enough for a user to take action?

Furthermore, your content leading to that call-to-action should be enticing enough for them to want to take action.

More Resources:


Featured Image: Motortion Films/Shutterstock

In-post image #4 created by author, June 2022





Source link

Continue Reading

Marketing

Freshness & SEO: An Underrated Concept

Published

on

Freshness & SEO: An Underrated Concept


The author’s views are entirely his or her own (excluding the unlikely event of hypnosis) and may not always reflect the views of Moz.

During my time in search, there are certain ranking factors that I’ve changed my perspective on. For instance, after coming to Go Fish Digital and working on internal linking initiatives, I started to realize the power of internal links over time. By implementing internal links at scale, we were able to see consistent success.

Freshness is another one of these factors. After working with a news organization and testing the learnings gained from that work on other sites, I started to see the immense power that content refreshes could produce. As a result, I think the entire SEO community has underrated this concept for quite some time. Let’s dig into why.

Reviewing news sites

This all started when we began to work with a large news publisher who was having trouble getting in Google’s Top Stories for highly competitive keywords. They were consistently finding that their content wasn’t able to get inclusion in this feature, and wanted to know why.

Inclusion in “Top stories”

We began to perform a lot of research around news outlets that seemed quite adept at getting included in Top Stories. This immediately turned our attention to CNN, the site that is by far the most skilled in acquiring coveted Top Stories positions.

By diving into their strategies, one consistent trend we noticed was that they would always create a brand new URL the day they wanted to be included in the Top Stories carousel:

As an example, here you can see that they create a unique URL for their rolling coverage of the Russia-Ukraine war. Since they know that Google will show Top Stories results daily for queries around this, they create brand new URLs every single day:

    • cnn.com/europe/live-news/russia-ukraine-war-news-05-16-22/index.html

    • cnn.com/europe/live-news/russia-ukraine-war-news-05-21-22/index.html

    • cnn.com/europe/live-news/russia-ukraine-war-news-05-23-22/index.html

This flies in the face of traditional SEO advice that indicates web owners need to keep consistent URLs in order to ensure equity isn’t diluted and keywords aren’t cannibalized. But to be eligible for Top Stories, Google needs a “fresh” URL to be indexed in order for the content to qualify.

After we started implementing the strategy of creating unique URLs every day, we saw much more consistent inclusion for this news outlet in Top Stories for their primary keywords.

However, the next question we wanted to address was not just how to get included in this feature, but also how to maintain strong ranking positions once there.

Ranking in “Top stories”

The next element that we looked at was how frequently competitors were updating their stories once in the Top Stories carousel, and were surprised at how frequently top news outlets refresh their content.

We found that competitors were aggressively updating their timestamps. For one query, when reviewing three articles over a four-hour period, we found the average time between updates for major outlets:

  1. USA Today: Every 8 Minutes

  2. New York Times: Every 27 minutes

  3. CNN: Every 28 minutes

For this particular query, USA Today was literally updating their page every 8 minutes and maintaining the #1 ranking position for Top Stories. Clearly, they were putting a lot of effort into the freshness of their content.

But what about the rest of us?

Of course, it’s obvious how this would apply to news sites. There is certainly no other vertical where the concept of “freshness” is going to carry more weight to the algorithm. However, this got us thinking about how valuable this concept would be to the broader web. Are other sites doing this, and would it be possible to see SEO success by updating content more frequently?

Evergreen content

Fortunately, we were able to perform even more research in this area. Our news client also had many non-news specific sections of their site. These sections contain more “evergreen” articles where more traditional SEO norms and rules should apply. One section of their site contains more “reviews” type of content, where they find the best products for a given category.

When reviewing articles for these topics, we also noticed patterns around freshness. In general, high ranking articles in competitive product areas (electronics, bedding, appliances) would aggressively update their timestamps on a monthly (sometimes weekly) cadence.

For example, as of the date of this writing (May 25th, 2022), I can see that all of the top three articles for “best mattress” have been updated within the last 7 days.

Looking at the term “best robot vacuum”, it looks like all of the articles have been updated in the last month (as of May 2022):

Even though these articles are more “evergreen” and not tied to the news cycle, it’s obvious that these sites are placing a high emphasis on freshness with frequent article updates. This indicated to us that there might be more benefits to freshness than just news story results.

Performing a test

We decided to start testing the concept of freshness on our own blog to see what the impact of these updates could be. We had an article on automotive SEO that used to perform quite well for “automotive seo” queries. However, in recent years, this page lost a lot of organic traffic:

The article still contained evergreen information, but it hadn’t been updated since 2016:

It was the perfect candidate for our test. To perform this test, we made only three changes to the article:

  1. Updated the content to ensure it was all current. This changed less than 5% of the text.

  2. Added “2022” to the title tag.

  3. Updated the timestamp.

Immediately, we saw rankings improve for the keyword “automotive seo”. We moved from ranking on the third page to the first page the day after we updated the content:

To verify these results, we tested this concept on another page. For this next article, we only updated the timestamp and title tag with no changes to the on-page content. While we normally wouldn’t recommend doing this, this was the only way we could isolate whether “freshness” was the driving change, and not the content adjustments.

However, after making these two updates, we could clearly see an immediate improvement to the traffic of the second page:

These two experiments combined with other tests we’ve performed are showing us that Google places value on the recency of content. This value extends beyond just articles tied to the news cycle.

Why does Google care?

E-A-T considerations

Thinking about this more holistically, Google utilizing the concept of freshness makes sense from their E-A-T initiatives. The whole concept of E-A-T is that Google wants to rank content that it can trust (written by experts, citing facts) above other search results. Google has a borderline public responsibility to ensure that the content it serves is accurate, so it’s in the search giant’s best interest to surface content that it thinks it can trust.

So how does freshness play into this? Well, if Google thinks content is outdated, how is it supposed to trust that the information is accurate? If the search engine sees that your article hasn’t been updated in five years while competitors have more recent content, that might be a signal that their content is more trustworthy than yours.

For example, for the term “best camera phones”, would you want to read an article last updated two years ago? For that matter, would you even want an article last updated six months ago?

As we can see, Google is only ranking pages that have been updated within the last one or two months. That’s because the technology changes so rapidly in this space that, unless you’re updating your articles every couple of months or so, you’re dramatically behind the curve.

Marketplace threats

The concept of freshness also makes sense from a competitive perspective. One of the biggest weaknesses of an indexation engine is that it’s inherently hard to serve real-time results. To find when content changes, a search engine needs time to recrawl and reindex content. When combined with the demands of crawling the web at scale, this becomes extremely difficult.

On the other hand, social media sites like Twitter don’t have this issue and are made to serve real-time content. The platform isn’t tasked with indexing results, and engagement metrics can help quickly surface content that’s gaining traction. As a result, Twitter does a much better job of surfacing trending content.

Thinking about the web from a platform based perspective, it makes sense that most users would choose Twitter over Google when looking for real-time information. This causes a big threat to Google, as it’s a reason for users to migrate off the ecosystem, thus presenting fewer opportunities to serve ads.

Recently in Top Stories, you now see a lot more “Live Blog Posts”. These articles utilize LiveBlogPosting structured data, which signals to Google that the content is getting updated in real-time. While looking for real-time URLs across the entire web is daunting, using this structured data type can help them better narrow in on content they need to be crawling and indexing more frequently.

Google seems to be aggressively pushing these live blogs in Top Stories as they often see strong visibility in Top Stories results:

This might be a strategic move to encourage publishers to create real-time content. The goal here could be increased adoption of content that’s updated in real-time with the end result of showcasing to users that they can get this type of content on Google, not just Twitter.

Utilizing these concepts moving forward

I think as an industry, sometimes there’s room for us to be more creative when thinking about our on-page optimizations. When looking at how to improve pages that have lost traffic and positions over time, we could take freshness into consideration. When looking at pages that have lost prominence over time, we might want to consider checking if that content is also outdated. Through testing and experimentation, you could see if updating the freshness of your content has noticeable positive impacts on ranking improvements.



Source link

Continue Reading

SEO

Google Search Console Insights For GA4 Properties Now Available

Published

on

Google Search Console Insights For GA4 Properties Now Available


In an update rolling out today, Google addresses a limitation of Google Analytics 4 (GA4) properties by making them compatible with Search Console Insights.

Combining data from Search Console and Google Analytics, Search Console Insights provides a thorough overview of how people discover your content across the web.

Since its launch in June 2021, Search Console Insights has only been compatible with Universal Analytics (UA) properties. If all you have are GA4 properties, your Insights section in Search Console would have been pretty bare.

It was a matter of time before GA4 support was added, however, as Google is sunsetting UA properties next year.

Using Search Console Insights

There are different ways to access Search Console Insights. You can get to it via:

  • A link at the top of the Overview page
  • From the navigation menu of Google’s mobile app
  • Search Google for a query that your site ranks for

Search Console Insights is accessible without Google Analytics, though linking the two together will provide you with more significant amounts of data.

Analyzing Data In Search Console Insights

Google designed GSC Insights to offer a snapshot of content performance within recent weeks. It only shows GA data for the last 28 days, which is sometimes compared to the prior 28-day period.

With that being the case, it’s helpful to check GSC Insights regularly as the data is frequently updated.

If you have a GA4 property and don’t see any data in the Insights section after today’s update, here are a few reasons why:

Your GSC property is not associated with a GA property.
You do not have sufficient permissions on GA.
You have the wrong GA view selected in GSC.

For more information, see: Google Search Console Insights: 7 Questions Answered.


Source: Google Search Central on Twitter

Featured Image: Screenshot from developers.google.com/search/blog, July 2022. 





Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Liveseo.com